Today I had something very unexpected happen.  Before I tell you what that was, I want to give you a bit of history.  From the time I was old enough to understand, my Mother told me I would get her ring when she died.  She had a jeweled watch that was the “wedding ring” of her mother that would go to my sister.  Toward the end of her life, my mother had to undergo chemo for uterine cancer.  She decided to hide her rings for fear of something happening to them while she was gone.  {Why then I have no idea.}  When she got home, the rings were “not where she put them.”

 

After much hunting, we thought the rings had been stolen and probably pawned for drug money.  My mother did not survive her cancer, and the rings were never found.  Mom passed away over 7 years ago, so it’s about 8 since I have seen her rings.  I struggled greatly over this and learned a lesson.  Don’t count your chickens don’t anticipate ownership of something in the future because you never know if it will happen or not.  It was an exercise in surrender for sure, but that’s another story.  Even when moving my dad out of the parsonage and going through everything, we did not find the rings.

 

I had surrendered them long ago, but had told God “if there be any way possible to bring them back to me.”  I didn’t want them for their monetary value.  I wanted them because they belonged to my Mommy!  All that to say this:  when I got to my Dad’s tonight, he showed me a set of rings one of his church people had found in the back of a dresser from his old house.  The rings had returned!!!!!      After many tears and prayers of gratitude, I slipped the rings on my little finger, having attained my inheritance at last!  GLORY!  What a wonderful Mother’s Day present to me.

This event reminded me of the parable of the lost coin.  In Luke 15:8-10, we find her story as told by Jesus.

 

The Lost Drachma

The Lost Drachma (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

8Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light    a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it?   9And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost.

While I did not have multiple rings, we did spend a lot of time searching for the lost ring.  It worried my mother so much, but in the end, I was happy just to have had her, even if the ring was never found.  The purpose of this parable was to point out that Jesus came to seek the lost and the sick, not those who were whole.  He values every person so much that He searches for them and draws them until they are found.

 

A better analogy here would be the “pearl of great price” found in Matthew 13:45-46. 

45Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: 46Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.

My mother’s wedding rings can never be replaced; they are valuable to me because they belonged to my mother.  You could offer me any amount of other rings of greater monetary value, and I would not trade you.  The kingdom of heaven is like that; it also can never be replaced.  It is of such great value that it is worth more than anything else we might have or could get.  Finding the Kingdom of Heaven (finding entry through the door of Jesus Christ) is more valuable than anything else.  In fact, it is life or death.  It is worth giving up everything else the world has to offer.  What good are worldly riches if we miss out on the greatest riches?  What good are other relationships if we miss out on a relationship with our God?  Finding the kingdom of heaven is the ultimate prize.

 

Have you found the pearl of great price?  Do you recognize its value?  Do you treat it as valuable?

Pearl nl: Parels de: Perlen

Pearl nl: Parels de: Perlen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So many Christians today do not act as if they know the value of what they have in Christ.  We are somewhat dismissive as we go about our daily routines, giving God Sunday mornings and maybe a tad more.  If we really understood what we have been given, if we really understood that this valuable gift is available to all, we would live with intention.  We would seek the pearl ourselves with all we have, and we would tell others how to get it as well.  I feel a bit disjointed in my writing here, so I hope it speaks to you as it has to me.

 

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